Holidays

I Love Dressing Up . . .

Around the holidays!  My friends also really like to get dressed up.  It’s an excuse to get fancy. –Beth Riesgraf

I speculate about half the people look at the holiday season with great disdain.  You have the nonsense of Black Friday and any other hopped up Christmas sale event.  You have the obligation of buying gifts for relatives they may see once a year as well as receiving gifts they wouldn’t give to their worst enemy.  You have the displeasure of sitting at the dinner table with relatives with differing political, racial, religious, academic or whatever views.  But at least when you go 636007535808318874_1917013326_fireover to that relative’s home for dinner, you can dress in sweatpants and an ugly Christmas sweater.  Wrong!   Burn that ffffffin thing!  I don’t know when it happened and quiet honestly couldn’t care less why it happened.  People stopped caring about their appearance during the holidays.  We’ve heard the “I want to be comfortable after gorging myself with enough food to feed a third world country” excuse.  Babo sekkiya . . . 

If you are part of the other half of people who enjoy the holidays, you most likely have a game plan in how to deal with the distractions of the holiday season.  You are ready for the relatives you see once in a blue moon and their pendulum-like views on any and everything (Maybe a shot of sambuca or soju will make it easier).  But most importantly, you will dress your holiday best and will be comfortable as you decide whether it’s bulking season or not.  As an individual who has been creating their own style, you are well aware one needs to constantly be on top of their game.  The holiday season is perfect time to experiment.  There is a desire to be comfortable, functional as well as the best dressed person in the room.  And if your relatives criticize the way you dress, are they really your relatives?

One should always go seasonal when picking out the color scheme you choose to wear.  Burgundys, greys, browns, greens are the basic foundation with all of the variations of the aforementioned.  For example, the picture above combines camel overcoat, grey wool trousers, purple and blue paisley tie, navy blue waistcoat, contrast collar blue/grey striped shirt, light blue pocket square and cedar/plaid brogues make for an appealing Thanksgiving outfit.  In the picture to the left, olive green blazer, hunter green gingham shirt, burgundy polka dot knit tie, poinsettia lapel pin, and a double sided pocket square to pull the Christmas outfit together.  As the picture dictates, do be afraid of adding a splash of color to bring your ensemble together.  Creating your own style involves “walking like you own it!”  Confidence in what you wear and how you wear it is paramount.  Your efforts to stay the course as well as stay away from appearing most substandardly should never wane.  As with all things in life, we should always look to learn more and improve our overall being as well as those around us.  No matter who you are or what you believe in, enjoy the holiday season and strive to be better next year.  Until next time, 메리 크리스마스!

*Featured picture: Overcoat by London Fog, scarf by Perry Ellis, waistcoat by Perry Ellis, shirt by Brooks Brothers, tie by Daniel De Fasson, shoes by Barker

*Supplemental picture: Blazer by Merona, shirt by Nautica, tie by Manzini, pocket square by Feather And Smith