Articles Tagged with Timex

The Hell With Circumstances . . .

I create opportunities. –Bruce Lee

Friday. September 8th. 3 PM. After celebrating Labor Day weekend days earlier, I as well as many of my co-workers were informed the business we put our labor into was closing its doors. The decision put all of us in a very uncompromising position. I have read these stories over the years and felt empathy for those who were unwilling placed in the personnel surplus reduction program.  Now, 700 + of us were being transitioned out of our positions permanently. What made it worse? It’s right before the holidays. So thankful. Ho-Ho-Ho.

I feel it’s a fitting segue for how to dress for a job interview, agree?

After dedicating well over eight thousand days of my life to one place (yes, I am loyal), it was time to search for a new place of employment. I created my resume, had it looked over, created a LinkedIn account and signed up on Indeed as well as Glassdoor. I uploaded the resume and began searching.  Winter is coming . . . 

I was never concerned about how I was going to dress for potential interviews.  I was worried about the interview process.  This is uncharted waters for me and my confidence was somewhat in question.  I was afraid of the uncertain.  Fear is considered a weakness.  It isn’t.  As long as one is at peace with it, you can use it to your advantage.  But I digress.  As of this blogging, I have already engaged in one face-to-face interview (thanks to a good phone interview) with another 2 in waiting.  I have been out of the employment search loop because of my time invested in place, so I was unaware of the phone interview. Good phone interviews as well as the body of work your resume presents, will lead to on-site interviews and this is wear where the focus will be centered on.

If you have been following this blog, you are more than aware of the importance of dressing well with a economical twist.  The dichotomy I spoke of in the introduction of this blog, First Impressions needs to be reconciled by all of us individually.  No one knows your capabilities better than you but one cannot go to an interview dressing as if it’s the weekend BBQ.  Always bring your A game.  That A game means a suit.  A grey or navy blue suit is best with a standard white dress shirt, matching shoes, belt and watch band.  If you choose to wear a pocket square, go with the timeless and simple white one.  The tie you choose should be simple and effective.  Choose your colors wisely and keep the patterns to a minimum.  Your job is to sell your self and the book cover must be presentable!  In our society, appearances are rather important when it comes to securing a job.  You never get a second chance to make a first impression.  I will advise against being too showing with jewellry, and cologne.  A minimalist watch is most effective and a light  touch of cologne. 

I don’t feel it is necessary to expound on the obvious such as making sure you shine your shoes, shave or trim your facial hair, make sure your shirt is ironed or pressed, brush your teeth, train, say your prayers, take your vitamins . . . wait a minute!  I apologize for getting carried away!

Be confident in presenting your story to a potential employer.  There are plenty resources of on-line to crash course before your big interview.  At the end of the day, whatever the circumstance may be, see it as an opportunity.  Until next time, jal ga! 

 

*Featured picture: Shoes by Banana Republic, tie by Tasso Elba, belt by Croft & Barrow, watch by Timex, 

*Supplemental picture: Suit by Alfani Red, shirt by Alfani

A Respectable Appearance . . .

is sufficient to make people more interested in your soul.  Karl Lagerfield

And a nice dress/casual shirt helps too.  There are so many designers of shirts and so many different styles one can choose from you may suffer from a case of vertigo.  At the end of the day, most designers will have something you are looking for when building your wardrobe and creating your own style.  There are a few kinds of shirts one should be interested in. I’m not speaking of the classic, modern, and slim fit.   I’m speaking of tab collar, collar bar/pin and flip-cuff shirts.  The latter is of the casual flavor.

In the featured picture (also, see left), I am wearing a collar bar shirt.  Eyelets in collar accommodate a collar bar as well as a collar pin.  It is truly a classy look that will up your overall appearance.  The main idea behind the collar bar/pin is to accentuate the tie one is wearing by pushing it up from the shirt.  Its genesis is from the 1920s and has been around for many decades.  Finding collar bars and collar pins are easy.  Finding a collar bar/pin dress shirt is not as easy.  The price point is high.  I recently purchased a white one from TopMan for $70 and this is considered reasonable.  In addition, having them custom made may be the way to go which may also be pricey.  But, if you keep searching you may end up lucky as I did.  The  J. Todd dress shirt was purchased on Ebay for $16.99.  It’s a regular fit shirt but it fits like a slim.  Apparently, it was a Marshall’s, Inc. brand and it was made in South Korea (daebakiya!).  The shirt fits perfect so to say I was rather impressed is an understatement.  Also, burgundy is very versatile.

The tab collar shirt eliminates the need to wear a collar bar or a collar pin.  Also, they are easier to find!  The picture to the right is to show what one is dealing with.  On a side note, I might as well consider Ebay my go to from this point on!  I won the Robert Talbott dress shirt, brand new for $19  It is grey and has a very small checkered print.  It was a classic fit but as always, my tailor did her magic. And I basically stole the Oscar de la Renta tie for 99 cents.  Yes, 99 cents.  Robert Talbott‘s shirts range from $195-$425 on Nordstrom’s so I will not state the obvious on this one.

The next style of shirt one should add to their respective repertoire is the flip-cuff.  The flip-cuff is self-explanatory.  It’s an added dimension to one’s style.  If you are a fan of the show Modern Family, you are aware Eric Stonestreet’s character Cameron fancies the flip-cuff shirt.  Traditionalists may will find them rather unattractive and abhor them.  I do not go crazy with some of the patterns but I do like them very much.  As I wrote about in a previous post, I have a unstructured blazer with functional buttons.  Flip-cuffs solve the problem when going very, very casual.  The standard seems to be the oxford blue when flipping the cuff as seen in the picture to the left.  I own a few flip-cuff shirts such as Alexander Julian, Nautica, Van Heusen, and Calvin Klein.  I recently added an Egara, a Jhanes Barnes, and a Robert Talbott.  Egara is a Men’s Warehouse brand.  It is a slim fit, made of Egyptian cotton and I purchased it for $15 on Ebay.  The picture to the right is a Jhane Barnes slim fit flip-cuff with some avant-garde designs that was purchased for $20 on Ebay.  Although she is no longer doing menswear (her final collection was the Fall of 2013), her clothes are still out there and can be bought at a nice price.

Flip-cuffs are nice if you like to roll up your sleeves.  I rarely roll my sleeves up.  When I do, it will most likely be when I am wearing a waistcoat.  What you are searching for depends on whether you desire to go conservative or wild with the color palette, roll up your sleeves or solve the problem of functioning buttons on your unstructured blazer.  Until next time, keep doing your research and keep experimenting to find your ultimate style!  Until next time, Jal ga!

 

*Featured picture: Jacket by Ermenegildo Zegna, tie by Manhattan, shirt by J. Todd, pocket square by Windom Finery, sunglasses by Miu Miu, watch by Movado ESQ